Monthly Archives: October 2017

Could Leeds Have a World Star on Debut at Leicester Tonight?   –   by Rob Atkinson

Kun Temenuzhkov

Kun Temenuzhkov appearing in the colours of Barcelona

Tonight’s Carabao Cup Tie at recent champions Leicester City could just see the first involvement in a senior Leeds United line up of a young international star who already enjoys global acclaim. 

Named as one of The Guardian’s top 60 young talents in the world, teenage sensation Kun Temenuzhkov has made several appearances for United’s under-23s this season after signing for the Whites in summer from Barcelona. It may be that the club see the Carabao Cup as the ideal situation to provide experience at first team level for such a hot prospect. Temenuzhkov’s absence from yesterday’s second-string match at Huddersfield has had fans speculating that his first team squad chance might be imminent. 

Whether the youngster would actually appear in the team, enabling Leeds to rest a regular striker for Friday’s summit meeting with Sheffield Utd has to be open to some doubt. But even travelling with the squad would be a sign of progress for the Bulgarian youth cap, and a mark of the esteem in which such a young player is held. 

It will be interesting to see what tonight’s team news reveals, with Leeds quite possibly looking to prioritise the sharing out of first team involvement. With a lad like Kun on the books, so highly regarded on the world stage in his age group, it might make sense to take a chance on broadening his experience. 

Two games in a few days will always test the club’s playing resources, and cup ties are increasingly seen as testing grounds for untried talent. An away clash at last season’s Champions League quarter-finalists would be a case of “in at the deep end” for Temenzhukov but, as the old saying goes, if they’re good enough, they’re old enough. 

Tonight might just be the first opportunity for Leeds fans to judge whether the latest wonderkid could actually have what it takes to succeed at Elland Road

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What do Leeds United need to do to turn around this run of form?

Divine duo

Christiansen and Radrizzani – keeping the faith

Until this weekend just gone, Leeds had lost four of the last five matches in all competitions, a seriously bad run for a team aspiring to promotion. The fact that three of those were league games serves to highlight the sharp contrast between our form up until just three weeks ago when we were top of the league and the present – when we now sit in fourth place only thanks to Saturday’s three point, three goal haul at Bristol City.

As we said in our post mortem of the Reading game last week, and even given the victory at Bristol – as one swallow does not a summer make –  the situation is dire at the moment. So what do the Whites have to do to turn it around? Let’s assess the options…

Is the manager the problem?

Absolutely not – I’m not even going to pussyfoot around with this one. Part of the problem at the club in recent years is the revolving door they seem to have installed in the manager’s office. We’ve had six managers in the last three years and none of them have had enough time to make their mark. What we need now is stability, not someone else coming in to rock the boat.

Leeds were unbeaten until mid-September when we lost 1-0 to Millwall and the team were a real joy to watch. Our emphatic 5-0 win over Burton Albion was a masterclass in tactics and showed the quality in the squad. Just a few weeks ago, the Whites were second favourites for promotion at 2/1 (mid-September). Now the odds our higher at 4/1, it may be worthwhile taking advantage of those bonuses and free football tips at Bethut.

After the Burton game, Nigel Clough held his hands up to concede Leeds’ sheer quality. None of the five goals we scored against Clough’s side were his goalkeeper’s fault – our movement and finishing made us unstoppable.

Despite the drop in our fortunes of late, the Leeds United board are clearly confident Christiansen can turn things around. After starting the season with all guns blazing, time is the very least the new manager deserves. Let’s face it – three wins won’t get us into the Premier League and three defeats don’t mean our campaign is over either.

Do we just need to regain confidence?

As the Secret Footballer says in an article in the guardian from 2012, there’s a strong correlation between lack of confidence and loss of form. Footballers are only human, after all. It stands to reason that confidence can waver when a run of four defeats in five games follows such glorious form.

Some players’ heads had started to drop – this was clear to anyone who watched the nervous way in which Pablo Hernandez took that late penalty against Reading. When we were flying high at the start of the season, Christiansen told us to expect ‘bad moments’ – and he was bang on. So instead of panicking, what we really need to do is get behind our team!

Post-Bristol update

And, as if to confirm the wisdom of that philosophy – what a difference a week has made! Saturday’s comprehensive win over a Bristol City with only one previous league defeat all season has completely changed perspectives. It’s amazing how one good win can do that. We’re still going strong in the playoffs and, apart from Beradi (anyone know what went on there – the footage was hardly conclusive), there was much to be pleased about – although we must not now rest on our laurels.

As many fans commented during the match, the Viera – Kalvin Phillips – O’Kane trio in midfield worked wonders and looks like the way forward, with far more energy and bite in that midfield area..

Top marks to TC and the lads too for dedicating the match to Stuart Dallas after his mother’s tragic passing last week – we also extend our condolences to Stuart and his family. MOT always.

Reading FC Expose Leeds’ Loss of Mojo & Jansson’s Missing Magic Hat – by Rob Atkinson

 

Rhinos

Super League Champions Leeds Rhinos on their Elland Road lap of honour

Without wishing to seem wise after the event (I like to think that my wisdom is pretty much a permanent fixture) I just knew that Leeds United’s last-gasp penalty would not go in. There would be no salvaging of a late point for the home side at Elland Road; Reading FC would depart with the three points yesterday’s script demanded. And so it came to pass as I looked on with a jaundiced eye. I just bloody knew it.

It was not a good Saturday. Leeds were sluggish and out of sorts, the referee was fussily horrible – at one point he allowed Reading to take a free kick for offside ten yards inside the Leeds half – and there was a general feeling of malaise. To say this was a bad day at the office for Leeds seems hopelessly inadequate – David Brent himself had a better day, that time he was sacked by Wernham Hogg. The only bright spot (and not even this applied to everybody in the 33,900 attendance) was the sight of the victorious Leeds Rhinos players parading the Super League champions trophy around the pitch at half time. It was good to see United saluting the achievements of another Leeds sporting institution.

It seemed to many of the Leeds persuasion, and to some impartial observers too, that Pablo Hernandez had been fouled in the build-up to Reading’s winning goal, scored with poetic injustice by last season’s United loanee failure Modou Barrow. Post-match opinions were polarised: Reading manager Jaap Stam felt it hadn’t been a foul (and also that there was no foul for the Leeds penalty); Leeds boss Thomas Christiansen disagreed, but noted that “foreign coaches should not complain”. Even so, he’d made his views clear from pitch-side at the time – afterwards though, he simply shrugged and remarked “Well, you saw it”.

For United, it was a day to forget as swiftly as possible and move sharply on. Reading, arrayed in a day-glo orange and looking like a set of highlighter pens, came to do a job; they did it, however irritatingly, and now it’s history. Leeds will have to concentrate on regaining their mislaid mojo over the next few fixtures; they’re still handily-placed, even after three successive defeats, courtesy of that scorching start to the season. But losing can become a nasty habit, and it’s something that Christiansen and his troops need to nip in the bud before an annoying blip becomes a genuine crisis.

The Leeds boss was philosophical after this latest setback, whilst hinting that a change of system is not out of the question if he judges that’s what is necessary to turn things around. One notable factor in Reading’s success was their tactic of pressing high to stop United playing out from the back as has been the preferred approach all season. On the day, the home side simply weren’t good or confident enough to deal with the way Stam’s men set out their stall to contain, frustrate and hit on the break. It was a bad, bad day; as simple as that.

And it could even have been worse, but therein lies the one positive aspect of yesterday. At long last there was a change of ‘keeper for a league game, with Andy Lonergan taking his chance to impress. Lonners pulled off a few really good saves and generally looked less error-prone than Felix Wiedwald has done on many of his appearances this term. Afterwards, when asked about the change, Christiansen said that it was something he’d been thinking about. Lonergan did his future prospects no harm at all, and we must hope that his relatively unflappable air of security might spread to a United back four that has looked shaky of late. Pontus Jansson in particular looked tentative and even clumsy at times in the Reading game; part of United’s reduced effectiveness is probably down to Jansson’s magic hat being worn slightly askew as compared to last season. 

It’s still early days, and the situation as it stands is far from dire. But Leeds must do more than hope for better days ahead; they must be proactive, and take steps to ensure that a sharp improvement comes about – sooner rather than later.

Video: If Abbott had been this clueless, it would be all over media

Awful, awful, awful. Yet another Tory rabbit caught in the headlights. Utterly clueless and equally hopeless.

The SKWAWKBOX

Chief Secretary to the Treasury Liz Truss has developed a reputation for utter uselessness that is as well-deserved as any in Westminster – but she appears to have become the Tories’ ‘go to’ spokesperson to defend their towering Universal Credit (UC) SNAFU (‘situation normal – all f***ed up’ – and for this Tory government it really is normal).

Just over a week ago, Ms Truss was a deer in the headlights at the Tory conference in Manchester where, when challenged over the disaster of thousands of people in desperate hardship because of UC delays, she answered that it couldn’t be so bad because her experience when she visited a Jobcentre had been positive.

Today, she appeared on the BBC’s Daily Politics programme. Again the topic was UC – and again she was clueless – completely unable to give a meaningful answer to Andrew Neil’s question about why the government was…

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Super League Grand Final post #1 – Is Briscoe back?

Success for the City of Leeds, always worth a reblog.

GET 'EM ONSIDE!

Saturday the 29th July saw Hull FC beat Leeds Rhinos 43-24 in the Challenge Cup semi final in Doncaster and it also saw Tom Briscoe targeted by Hull. Time and time again he was exposed to high kicks by Albert Kelly and, mostly, Mark Sneyd and he was found wanting, being at fault for allowing many of Hull’s points to be scored. Many Rhinos fans and rugby league supporters cast doubts over Briscoe’s ability and confidence and questioned whether he should be in the first team picture.

Coach Brian McDermott stood by his man, defended him in the press and stated that the winger and his teammates were working on helping develop Briscoe’s ability in this area. As the season got to the business end and the pressure increased as the Grand Final began to loom large, his improvement was evident – against Hull in the semi final he was…

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