Bradford Fire Disaster 30th Anniversary – by Rob Atkinson


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Horrific scenes as the Bradford main stand burns fiercely

30 years ago today, I went to watch Leeds United play at St Andrews, Birmingham City‘s ground, in order to support the United lads, who still had a faint mathematical chance of promotion. These were the bad old days, when football violence was still highly fashionable, and it was predictable that things would get out of hand given the slightest excuse. Well, Leeds went one down, it was a crap game, and get out of hand things certainly did. There was a mass riot, invasions of the pitch from both sets of supporters, police horses tried to get between the warring groups and general mayhem ensued for quite a time. Inside the ground, a 12 foot wall collapsed and a young lad was crushed to death. It was a tragedy of the times, crowd disturbances were commonplace and only 18 days later, trouble at the Heysel Stadium in Belgium would cost the lives of 39 Italian fans as the European Cup Final between Liverpool and Juventus was fatally marred by ugly scenes of violence.

As the Leeds fans emerged from Birmingham’s ground though, we were totally unaware that an event had been unfolding back home in Yorkshire that would cost 56 more lives, leave hundreds injured and traumatised and form another catastrophic part of that dreadful month of May 1985. At Valley Parade, the antiquated home of Bradford City, a fire had broken out in the main stand, a ramshackle construction of timber with an oft commented-on build-up of litter beneath the wooden seats – a calamity waiting to happen. On that Saturday afternoon, as spectators packed the old stand to greet their promotion-winning Third Division Champions, the calamity did happen, and with unbelievable speed and ferocity.

At about 3:40 pm, ITV commentator John Helm noted that there appeared to be a small outbreak of fire in the main stand. Within four minutes, on a dry and windy day, the fire had engulfed the whole of the stand, trapping many in their seats. People dashing to the back of the stand for fire extinguishers found none – they had amazingly been removed for fear of vandalism – and the fleeing crowds were forced to break down locked exits in order to escape. Others escaped forward onto the pitch, and within the burning stand there were acts of outstanding heroism as some people tried to assist those less able, without regard for their own safety. The design and build of the ancient stand conspired in its swift destruction; the roof was of wood covered with tarpaulin and sealed with asphalt and bitumen. The whole structure was, in effect, one big incendiary bomb which had been waiting to go off for years.  Now, a single lighted match or cigarette, dropped under the seats onto the accumulated litter below, had started a conflagration that raged out of control before anyone could summon help. It was a miracle, aided by the selfless bravery of many of the spectators who rescued their neighbours, that more weren’t killed.

As it was, 56 deaths and hundreds injured left its mark on the game, and rightly so. The Popplewell Inquiry led to the introduction of new legislation to improve safety at sports grounds, and construction of new stands from wood was banned at all UK sports venues. Thankfully, the death toll had been somewhat limited by the absence of perimeter fencing around the pitch, a lethal factor in the 96 deaths at the Hillsborough disaster 4 years later. Bradford City’s ground now is unrecognisable from the ramshackle stadium I remember as a student in the city in 1981, when I attended a League Cup tie against Ipswich and marvelled from the open Kop at the sheer age and dilapidation of the wooden stand to my right. A magnificent state-of-the-art main stand now crowns the development which has taken place on all four sides of the arena – a credit to the City, to the Football Club and to the memory of those fans who died – 54 from Bradford City and 2 from their opponents that day, Lincoln City.

Later that year, in July, I attended a Bradford City memorial game at Elland Road when the majority of the 1966 World Cup Final teams, England and West Germany, turned out for a rematch. England won again, 6-4 with Geoff Hurst scoring another hat-trick, Uwe Seeler scoring a quite magnificent goal at the Kop End, and the late Alan Ball notching for England too, as did Martin Peters – the other Three Lions scorer in ’66. England were captained by the late, great Bobby Moore, and our own Jack Charlton appeared with lesser-known brother Bobby. It was a wonderful occasion and a fitting tribute to the dead and injured of the Valley Parade fire, raising many thousands towards an eventual total of £3.5 million for the Bradford Disaster Appeal Fund.

On this pleasant late spring day, when the memories of that awful summer of 1985 are receding further and further into the past, let us pause and remember those who died this day 30 years ago, as well as the victims of the Heysel Tragedy – and not forgetting young Ian Hambridge who died when that wall collapsed at St Andrews while football fans unknowingly rioted all around. Ian would be 45 now; he and 56 others at Bradford were robbed of their lives by the events of the day. Rest in peace, all of them – and let’s be thankful that we’ve seemingly moved on from that dark period in football and stadium history.

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4 responses to “Bradford Fire Disaster 30th Anniversary – by Rob Atkinson

  1. I was at Birmingham that day & I must admit that if it wasn’t for the Bradford Fire disaster taking up all the world news that fateful afternoon then I think that there would have been a good possibility that we would have been thrown out of the football league for what we did that day. I remember whilst we were all on the pitch, looking up into the corporate box’s along the touchline & seeing the fire on the tv screens. We were bad that day… very bad & so too were Birmingham but nowhere near as bad as us. I think that’s why it paled into insignificance what went on at Birmingham that sad fateful day. However, as regards the 16 year old Leeds fan that got crushed to death at Birmingham that day, I was also caught in that wall collapsing along with a few of my friends, one of who ended up with a broken arm & leg. A few of us were trying to lift the sections of wall off those trapped underneath but were unable to do so. I won’t go in to in’s and out’s of what caused it as I know the truth but what grates at me is the fact that everyone seems to remember and respect the 56 who died at Bradford that day along with the many, many more whom were injured yet the poor 16 year old Leeds lad that died an horrific death of having the life crushed out of him hardly gets a mention & there is no minutes silence around football stadia or any tangible acknowledgment for the loss of this solitary soul. No one ever goes to watch a game of football and expects to never come home again and I just wish the poor lad could be equally remembered along with the victims of the Bradford fire, as this lad was an innocent victim of circumstance as well.

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  2. dirty leeds

    Great piece rob..rivarly aside,its a game of football,and every human being should be able to enjoy a football match.thank God them days are behind us.

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  3. Philip of Spain.

    Good article Rob,I had two friends there at the match,one ran home in a panic,thinking the other had perished,both being in that stand.Luckily he was dragged out but quite badly burned on his hands and arms and suffering from smoke inhalation but very grateful to be alive after being trapped for a while.A dreadful,dreadful day.

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  4. Rob,
    As you’ve reiterated in previous articles, we should all be able to walk home safely after every game, its only football, not war, ti all those that perished R.I.P.
    Don

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