Tag Archives: Charlie Taylor

Burnley’s Sean Dyche Embarrasses Himself After Defeat to Leeds Utd – by Rob Atkinson

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Burnley boss Sean Dyche – seemingly unsure as to the relative locations of arse and elbow

This blog is not usually in the habit of upbraiding opposition managers and coaches for their post-match comments, particularly in the wake of a defeat. It’s an edgy and sensitive time, feelings run high and the vocal cords are occasionally allowed to twang more freely than perhaps they should. But, after Burnley‘s exit last night from the Carabao Cup at the hands of Leeds United, Clarets boss Sean Dyche came out with a couple of real whoppers that really cannot be allowed to pass unremarked upon.

Firstly, and most surprisingly, Mr. Dyche – perhaps casting about for some excuse as to why his Premier League beauties had failed to beat a Championship side showing nine changes from its nominal first XI – ventured to criticise referee Darren Bond‘s decision to award United a penalty kick deep into injury time of the 90 minutes (and shortly after he’d made a similar decision at the other end). Demonstrating what can only be called an appalling ignorance of the laws of the game, Dyche said “They get a penalty, which I think is a real soft one. He (Tarkowski) does pull his shirt but the ball is seven feet above his head. It’s impossible that it’s impeded him from actually scoring a goal,” he added.

It’s hard to know where to start with that one. But let us state simply and clearly, for the avoidance of doubt and to emphasise the depth of Sean’s silliness, that a shirt pull by a defender on an attacker (which he acknowledges did happen) in the penalty area, is a foul and a penalty kick. It’s as simple as that, there are no ifs, buts or maybes, and there’s no caveat along the lines of “did it prevent a goal-scoring opportunity”. Such complexities are for decisions over cautions, not the award of a free kick or a penalty kick for an obvious foul. For a professional coach at Premier League level to suggest otherwise, and presume to criticise the referee in the process, is at best an insulting attempt to pull the wool over people’s eyes. At worst, it amounts to a quite astounding ignorance of the laws of the game, and a lack of the basic knowledge needed by any football professional.

Dyche’s second ridiculous observation was targeted at an area outside the professional arena, so is perhaps more understandable, if not excusable. The Clarets boss professed himself bemused at the level of abuse aimed by the travelling Leeds support (who were quite phenomenal, as ever) at former Whites Charlie Taylor and Chris Wood. Dyche seemed to think that the Leeds fans should have done their sums, realised how much money United had raked in from the two transfers, and applauded the departed duo politely, as if this were a cricket match on the village green, with the church clock standing at ten to three, and honey still for tea. Again, you have to wonder at the Ginger One‘s knowledge and appreciation of football and football support. Remember, these two players had both committed the ultimate sin, in fans’ eyes, of refusing to play for their club in order to facilitate a transfer away from that club. There are very few lower depths to plumb than that.

Perhaps Sean was simply nettled and disappointed, on a night when his club had exited the Carabao Cup and had been trolled afterwards by one of their own sponsors. But in that case he’d have done far better to bite his tongue, purse his lips and keep his mouth firmly shut. In making the comments he made after last night’s game, he’s simply made a fool of himself – mainly by his bizarre interpretation of the laws surrounding penalty kicks, which are really not open to being seen as he appeared to wish.

It’s probably too much to suppose that a hurt and humiliated football coach will have second and better thoughts, leading him to withdraw the remarks highlighted here – but if Mr. Dyche did choose to go down that road, to admit that he was factually incorrect, in error of judgement and foolish to express such dubious views – well, possibly he would emerge as a bigger man and regain some respect. But, as things stand, someone who’s on record as having said such very daft and uncalled-for things as Dyche was guilty of, cannot really ask to be viewed with much respect at all.

And Sean – respect matters. Because, win, lose, or draw, Cup progress or Cup exit, and even with the local police seemingly firmly on your side – you won’t last much longer in football without that particular commodity.

silly sean

-o0o-

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Charlie Taylor to Follow the Judas Kewell Path to Galatasaray? – by Rob Atkinson

Kewell

Don’t be a charlie like Harry, Charlie

Rumour has it that, having ungratefully bitten the hand that’s fed him for so long, left-back turned militant striker Charlie Taylor is now rubbing salt into freshly-opened wounds by considering overtures from Galatasaray – a club which makes our old friends and foes the Pride of Devon seem positively adorable.

The Istanbul club are rightly held in contempt and derision by Leeds United fans, for their attitude and actions at the time of the murders by their fans of Kevin Speight and Chris Loftus the night before a UEFA Cup semi-final in 2000. No respect was shown, the home side wore no black armbands, and the Galatasaray club sought cynically to manipulate the tragedy to their own advantage by demanding the return leg be played elsewhere than at Elland Road

When Harry Kewell joined the Turkish club some years later, it was literally hard for United fans to believe that a man who played for Leeds in that semi-final, and experienced the hatred of the savage and uncivilised Galatasaray fans, could ever consider wearing their colours. It was a sick, horrible nightmare, surely, rather than some bizarre reality. But Kewell really did make the move, with some weasel words about wanting to build bridges (nowt to do with money, of course) – and he’s been despised by Leeds fans ever since.

Now, Fotospora Turkish news source, have suggested that Taylor is a possibility for the Galatasaray squad next season, though they acknowledge that the hostility between the two clubs could be a stumbling block. But, as ever with these matters, it’d likely be down to the player himself if there is a genuine interest from Turkey.

Memo to Charlie Taylor: don’t be a silly boy. Get yourself to that Premier League subs bench you’ll be occupying next season and stay there, counting your money. There’s no need to court hatred having already earned contempt. Look at your history books and do the right thing.

One ex-Leeds player at that awful club was bad enough. Two making the same ridiculous and selfish decision would look a bit too much like taking the piss.

Who Will Take a Punt on Leeds Disgrace Charlie Taylor Now? – by Rob Atkinson

Middlesbrough v Leeds United - Sky Bet Championship

Charlie Taylor – disgrace

The news from Wigan this afternoon, following United’s 1-1 draw to end an ultimately disappointing season, was that full-back Charlie Taylor refused to turn out for Leeds. This comes straight from the mouth of manager Garry Monk, via respected journo Adam Pope, so we can assume it’s reliable. And, if it is true, there can be little more disgraceful than the base treachery of a rich young man, content to pick up his lavish wage while arrogantly insisting that he’s not prepared to soil his hands with any actual work.

That old Billy Bremner motto “Side before self, every time” seems to be an outdated notion as far as many of today’s spoiled young football millionaires are concerned. If anything, they might reverse the saying and use it as a rallying cry for the selfish and materialistic end of their profession. It’s often said that thousands out there with the words Leeds United carved deep and painfully into their very hearts, would happily don that famous shirt for free, or even pay for the privilege – just to have one chance to tread the hallowed turf in United’s cause. And it’s doubtless true. But all of that is just so much sentimental hogwash to your average self-involved young “pro” of today.

If I sound angry, it’s because I am. The game I fell in love with is now spattered, like a car windscreen at a gull-infested seaside resort, with examples of arrogance and self-interest. King Billy must be spinning in his grave, because this daft Charlie is just the latest in a long line of young blots on the game. Taylor is doubtless advised and encouraged by an agent, who should also know better – because having what amounts to strike action on your CV at such an early stage of a promising career is hardly calculated to inspire confidence in future employers.

Still, Taylor will end up somewhere. West Brom, perhaps – we might even find ourselves passing him on the way down as we head up this time next year. Which would be satisfying karma at least.

Some players leave with a job well done and good wishes for the future. Again, there will be some who will wave farewell to Taylor with just such feelings, but they’re surely the minority and a misguided one at that. Taylor has let his manager down, his team-mates, the club and the thousands of fans who have applauded his every every moment in a Leeds United shirt. And, despite all of this, he will quite happily continue to pick up his ill-deserved money until the moment he slithers out of the Elland Road door. In hard times, that must leave a nasty taste in more mouths than just mine alone.

Like most Leeds fans, I’m hoping for better times ahead, without Cellino, without some surplus deadwood, and perhaps with some proper investment. The future might be bright – let’s hope so.

What I’m most afraid of, though, is that the game nowadays is so far gone as compared to the dear old pre-Sky times, that our future never can be as bright and enjoyable as our past. And the reason for that is to be found mainly in the attitude and selfish priorities of young ne’er-do-wells like Charlie Taylor.

Good riddance to bad rubbish.