Tag Archives: football fans

Burnley’s Sean Dyche Embarrasses Himself After Defeat to Leeds Utd – by Rob Atkinson

sean_dyche_manager_of_burnley_looks_on_during_the_premier_league_546102

Burnley boss Sean Dyche – seemingly unsure as to the relative locations of arse and elbow

This blog is not usually in the habit of upbraiding opposition managers and coaches for their post-match comments, particularly in the wake of a defeat. It’s an edgy and sensitive time, feelings run high and the vocal cords are occasionally allowed to twang more freely than perhaps they should. But, after Burnley‘s exit last night from the Carabao Cup at the hands of Leeds United, Clarets boss Sean Dyche came out with a couple of real whoppers that really cannot be allowed to pass unremarked upon.

Firstly, and most surprisingly, Mr. Dyche – perhaps casting about for some excuse as to why his Premier League beauties had failed to beat a Championship side showing nine changes from its nominal first XI – ventured to criticise referee Darren Bond‘s decision to award United a penalty kick deep into injury time of the 90 minutes (and shortly after he’d made a similar decision at the other end). Demonstrating what can only be called an appalling ignorance of the laws of the game, Dyche said “They get a penalty, which I think is a real soft one. He (Tarkowski) does pull his shirt but the ball is seven feet above his head. It’s impossible that it’s impeded him from actually scoring a goal,” he added.

It’s hard to know where to start with that one. But let us state simply and clearly, for the avoidance of doubt and to emphasise the depth of Sean’s silliness, that a shirt pull by a defender on an attacker (which he acknowledges did happen) in the penalty area, is a foul and a penalty kick. It’s as simple as that, there are no ifs, buts or maybes, and there’s no caveat along the lines of “did it prevent a goal-scoring opportunity”. Such complexities are for decisions over cautions, not the award of a free kick or a penalty kick for an obvious foul. For a professional coach at Premier League level to suggest otherwise, and presume to criticise the referee in the process, is at best an insulting attempt to pull the wool over people’s eyes. At worst, it amounts to a quite astounding ignorance of the laws of the game, and a lack of the basic knowledge needed by any football professional.

Dyche’s second ridiculous observation was targeted at an area outside the professional arena, so is perhaps more understandable, if not excusable. The Clarets boss professed himself bemused at the level of abuse aimed by the travelling Leeds support (who were quite phenomenal, as ever) at former Whites Charlie Taylor and Chris Wood. Dyche seemed to think that the Leeds fans should have done their sums, realised how much money United had raked in from the two transfers, and applauded the departed duo politely, as if this were a cricket match on the village green, with the church clock standing at ten to three, and honey still for tea. Again, you have to wonder at the Ginger One‘s knowledge and appreciation of football and football support. Remember, these two players had both committed the ultimate sin, in fans’ eyes, of refusing to play for their club in order to facilitate a transfer away from that club. There are very few lower depths to plumb than that.

Perhaps Sean was simply nettled and disappointed, on a night when his club had exited the Carabao Cup and had been trolled afterwards by one of their own sponsors. But in that case he’d have done far better to bite his tongue, purse his lips and keep his mouth firmly shut. In making the comments he made after last night’s game, he’s simply made a fool of himself – mainly by his bizarre interpretation of the laws surrounding penalty kicks, which are really not open to being seen as he appeared to wish.

It’s probably too much to suppose that a hurt and humiliated football coach will have second and better thoughts, leading him to withdraw the remarks highlighted here – but if Mr. Dyche did choose to go down that road, to admit that he was factually incorrect, in error of judgement and foolish to express such dubious views – well, possibly he would emerge as a bigger man and regain some respect. But, as things stand, someone who’s on record as having said such very daft and uncalled-for things as Dyche was guilty of, cannot really ask to be viewed with much respect at all.

And Sean – respect matters. Because, win, lose, or draw, Cup progress or Cup exit, and even with the local police seemingly firmly on your side – you won’t last much longer in football without that particular commodity.

silly sean

-o0o-

While you’re here – a gentle and polite reminder. Life, Leeds United, the Universe & Everything depends on your donations to keep going. Please click HERE to donate what you can – even a quid or two makes a big difference. This blog will never hide behind a paywall, so it relies on your generosity for its continued existence. Thank you – MOT.

Advertisements

Can Leeds United Hero, Agent Moyes, Keep Up his Good Work?? – by Rob Atkinson

Moyes - a hero to not just Leeds fans

Moyes – a hero to not just Leeds fans

The Leeds United “Man of the Season” for 2013/14, David Moyes, certainly pulled all the stops out last time around as – virtually single-handed – he returned Man U to the mediocrity from which they should never have emerged, cheering up all real fans of the One True United in the process.

Sadly, his distinguished service to the game in general, and to those of an Elland Road persuasion in particular, earned him only the dubious reward of the sack. It’s a shame, especially as he was looking ready and able to build on his many unprecedented achievements at the Theatre of Hollow Myths. Now the fallen media favourites will set about recovery. True to their legendary youth policy and horror of buying success, they already seem committed to a £60m outlay on two players. Even though talent and success are withering and waning at the Trafford Redsox Ballpark, hypocrisy, that hardy annual of the Man U psyche, flourishes yet.

The fantastic job Moyes did at the Man U franchise, reducing the Pride of Devon to the laughing stock of the North West, was a masterpiece of destruction, fully appreciated by football lovers everywhere except Torquay, Milton Keynes and Barnsley. Every other Lancashire club helped themselves to six easy points from the so-called “Greatest Club in the World” and two feeble Cup exits at home had proper football fans everywhere splitting their sides laughing. For those with the good of the game at heart, the legend that is Moyes attained a status accorded normally only to heroes. How very apt.

Now it appears that Moyes is set to move on to the other target at the top of any Leeds fan’s hate list, and set about his work of annihilation at Galatasaray, a club who deserve to plummet just as precipitously as did Man U – if not more so.

No explanation is necessary for the hatred and contempt that Leeds United fans bear for that dreadful club and its animal fans.  The matter speaks for itself. Suffice it to say, as far as this blog is concerned, that failure and misery is the very least we wish them – and if last season’s exploits are anything to go by, then we might just have the very man in David Moyes to bring about those desirable outcomes.  However he managed to compass the demise of the Stretford Scum, more power to his elbow in employing exactly the same techniques to bring down the most disgusting club in the world to a well-deserved low point in their recent history.

Moyes, after all, has done it once; he can certainly do it again.  Even at Everton, where his performance supposedly fitted him for “elevation” to the hot-seat at the Theatre of Hollow Myths, his record was notably silverware-free.  In the wake of his departure for pastures more perilous, Everton – under the studiously technical guidance of Roberto Martinez – have enjoyed their best season for years, including six points from Man U as they finally fulfilled Moysie’s decade-long dream of finishing above their rivals from the red quarter of Manchester.

Good luck then, David Moyes, adopted hero of Leeds United fans as well as those of several other clubs, as you set forth to write a new and hopefully grimly disappointing chapter in the history of a club for whom despair and disappointment should be the norm.  We shall follow your progress with interest.  Closer to home, we’ll all be hoping that the legacy of your reign at Man U is not so easily undone, and that a repeat of last season’s hilarious cock-ups may be afforded us.  Really, as long-suffering Leeds fans, it’s the very least we deserve.