Tag Archives: Patrick Bamford

Posh Patrick Has Become Paddy the Baddy, and Leeds Fans Just Love It – by Rob Atkinson

Paddy the Baddy advising angry Reading fans to pipe down

There may well still be a small section of Leeds United fans who don’t quite “get” Patrick Bamford, although they’ve been noticeably quieter of late – as the majority of Whites fans seem finally to have cottoned on to our number nine’s value to the team. But there’s mounting evidence to suggest that Mr. Bamford certainly does “get” Leeds United, football’s perennial pantomime villains and the club opposing fans just love to hate. Bamford seems to have bought into United’s “the world’s against us and they can get stuffed” mindset, and just lately he’s been feeding off that siege mentality vibe, fanning the flames of opposition hate, thriving on all of that negative energy. It’s been a joy to witness for any Leeds fan who glories in that old maxim “Our history makes us strong, your hatred makes us stronger still”.

Perhaps Bamford’s more defiant and in your face attitude has its roots in his much tougher and more durable physicality this season. He seems to have developed a core of steel, giving as good as he takes in terms of the rough stuff while still retaining his cultured approach and all round ability. Bamford is certainly no soft touch nowadays, and his opponents will know they’ve been in a game after the ninety minute nightmare of trying to cope with his relentless work rate and intelligent movement. But, although this factor is appreciated by the more knowledgeable Leeds fans, it’s that extra edge, that emerging nasty streak and accompanying tendency to rub the noses of opposing players and fans well and truly in it, that has really caught the eye of his admirers this season. Football fans have a word for this phenomenon, but it’s not one that I’d want to use in a family-friendly blog, so I’ll move swiftly on.

But, whatever you want to call it, it’s certainly working wonders for Bamford, in terms of his effectiveness on the field as well as the esteem in which he’s held off it. Recent manifestations of Paddy the Baddy have been sighted at Luton and at Reading, where he has made a point of winding up frustrated home fans after United’s winning goals. Add this to his heartwarming tendency to give direct opponents a physically difficult battle, and you’ve got the kind of striker that will always find a place in Leeds United fans’ affections. Bamford himself admitted recently that he’s “feeling the love” from the fans, a happy situation for a hard-working and committed striker who doesn’t always get the breaks his application and skill deserve in the attacking third of the pitch.

The thing is, even when all this effort fails to reap a goals dividend, it’s becoming clear that Bamford’s contribution is vital to United’s season. On Tuesday night, right at the end of a hard-fought win over Hull City, we saw a neat demonstration of how our Patrick puts in a shift for the team, and is not discouraged when luck is not with him in terms of goals – which, let’s face it, are the life-blood of any striker. And it was somebody else’s match-clinching goal after 86 minutes on Tuesday that summed up the Bamford effect, as he combined with keeper Kiko Casilla to scramble clear a goal-bound effort from a Hull corner. The ball was immediately played upfield, and Bamford put in a lung-bursting run to the opposite penalty area to thud a shot against the visitors’ post. Luckless again, but his narrow miss rebounded to Gjanni Alioski, who buried the chance from a narrow angle to end the Tigers’ resistance.

And that, my fellow Leeds United fans, is the Bamford effect in a nutshell, and long may it continue to manifest itself to our advantage. Because, whether it’s Posh Patrick or Paddy the Baddy we’d rather cheer from the stands, both will have a big part to play if we really are finally going to go up to the Premier League.

 

“Absolutely Awful”, “Rubbish” – Some Leeds fans have had Enough of Gutter Online Press – by Rob Atkinson

Bamford

Patrick Bamford, latest scapegoat for the gutter online boo boys

In the aftermath of the Birmingham City defeat, the usual suspects were lining up on Twitter to provide their knee-jerk, clueless verdicts on this week’s chosen scapegoat. Really, the identity of the scapegoat is secondary in importance to these peddlers of lazy and destructive abuse; what is most vital to them is to be seen as part of a chorus of disapproval. The fact that they come across as ignorant and unhelpful is, evidently, of no concern to these people, who represent the very antithesis of “support”.

It wouldn’t be so bad is it was only a case of a few attention-seeking individuals who live, move and have their tragic existences on Twitter (other social media bandwagons are available). But the sorry truth is that there are various online sites, masquerading as news sources, who make a point of trawling social media for clueless negativity, and presenting the results of their dredging as if it were a news story, under the kind of headline I’ve parodied for this article. This is becoming more and more common, as these grubby sites queue up to spread anger and despair, doing their level best to demoralise proper fans, as well as the players from whom, of course, the regular scapegoats have to be selected (Patrick Bamford this week, as it happens).

This sort of thing is to good journalism, or even to amateur blogging, what Julian Clary is to Rugby League. There’s no real content, only a sort of digest of 280 character whinges from the dregs of Leeds United‘s online community, intended to destroy the target’s confidence whilst garnering the ignorant approval of slack-jawed, like-minded readers. The likes of “Sportslens” publish this rubbish regularly, as blatant clickbait, and it must be worth their while. But it’s hardly a valid contribution to any sort of debate.

Soon enough, this season will be over, and the tributes or post mortems, as appropriate, will be written. I can only hope, trust, and do my small part to ensure, that such pieces are readable and that they reflect what’s actually happened during this momentous campaign. Because, if it’s left to the likes of “Sportslens” and their dire equivalents elsewhere in the ether, then you can bet your bottom dollar it’ll be just more ordure from the sewer level of Twitter and the rest of the idiots’ platforms. And, surely, we all deserve better than that.   

Football League Effectively Confirms That Nutting Leeds Players at Elland Road is Quite Acceptable – by Rob Atkinson

Krul

Tim Krul takes matters into his own head after Saturday’s Leeds v Norwich game

It is expected that, in line with the Football League‘s permissive policy on headbutting Leeds United footballers, Norwich City goalkeeper Tim Krul will face no further or retrospective action after his final whistle dash to the halfway line, where he “appeared to lean his head into Bamford’s” as tempers ran high.

Normally, this is the sort of aggressive action that could see a player booked or even sent off – and Krul had already been cautioned for a flying elbow into the neck of Tyler Roberts during the first half. But now the Football League have confirmed that, following the precedent set when Brentford’s Sergi Canos nutted United’s Ezgjan Alioski during a match at Elland Road back in October, it is perfectly alright for visiting players to butt anyone they like, as long as the target is wearing a Leeds United shirt.

Football League spokesman Lee D. Shater observed “Yes, this is normally the sort of thing we’d take a dim view of, of course it is. But we have to administer discipline according to precedent, and quite clearly the Brentford incident went unpunished, so Mr. Krul is in the clear as regards to this one”.

When asked by Life, Leeds United, the Universe & Everything if this wasn’t effectively declaring open season on Leeds players, and laying them wide open to being headbutted willy-nilly, Mr. Shater confined himself to the cryptic statement “Quite frankly, we couldn’t give a toss”. Tim Krul himself stayed true to the native Dutch meaning of his surname, “pig-ignorant”, and declined to comment.

Former League Chairman Alan Hardaker, 107, is still dead.